Urban’s Vegetarian BBQ Beans

Yesterday was Father’s Day, and the grill was in play. We had burgers and potato salad and green salad, but dang it, I wanted beans, and I wanted ‘em baked, and I wanted ‘em BBQ style, so that’s what I made. Since we already had burgers in the mix, I made them vegetarian.

I often see questions about what the proper beans for baked beans are – my answer is that you really can use anything you like, but you do want to have a pretty good idea of what you choose brings to the table. You don’t want to drown a particularly flavorful bean in a heavy mix where their subtleties would get lost – but really, the color or size doesn’t matter as much as if they’re tasty and you love ‘em.

Whatever variety you choose, they better be dry beans you cook at home – making this dish with canned beans is an affront to the Legume Gods, and you never want to piss them off… Traditionally, American baked beans use white varieties like Navy or Great Northern. If you’re a Rancho Gordo fan, Alubia Blanca, Ayocote Blanco, Mogette de Vendée, Yellow Eyes, and Vaqueros all make excellent baked beans, (and if you love beans and your not an RG fan, shame on you – get with the program!)

Barbecue sauce is a really broad term – we could be talking mustard based, tomato based, vinegar based, and everything in between. For baked beans, tomato based is the ticket, although I wouldn’t discount experimentation farther afield. Typical BBQ sauce is a balance of sweet and tart, and a little heat – and balance is the key. In my not even remotely humble opinion, using store bought sauce is a crime – it’s super easy to make and so much better when you do.

Here’s my swing on them beans. If you really want to impart some magic into the mix, bake them in clay – like cast iron, clay cookers add a subtle but unmistakable note to the mix that’s hard to beat.

Urban’s Vegetarian BBQ Beans


1/2 Pound Par Cooked Beans (al dente is where you want them)

1 Cup Sweet Onion

1/2 Cup Sweet Bell Pepper

2 fat cloves fresh Garlic

1 Roma Tomato

1/2 Cup Tomato Sauce

1/2 Cup Bean Broth

2 Tablespoons Tomato Paste

2 Tablespoons Light Molasses

1 teaspoon Yellow Mustard

2-3 shakes Hot Sauce, (Tabasco, or whatever you like)

Pinch salt

6-8 twists Black Pepper


In a heavy pan over high heat, add beans, a slice of onion, and 2 bay leaves with at least 2” of water over bean level and bring to a boil.

Allow beans to boil for 5 minutes, then reduce heat to a bare simmer and cook until al dente, about 20 to 40 minutes depending on variety and where you’re cooking.

Remove beans from heat and allow to cool in the bean broth, (never discard bean broth, it’s kitchen magic).

End trim, peel and fine dice onion, bell pepper, and tomato.

End trim, peel and mince garlic.

Combine all ingredients except beans and veggies in a mixing bowl and whisk to thoroughly incorporate. Let that sit for about 15 minutes, so everybody gets to know one another.

Preheat oven to 300° F.

In an oven safe baking dish, combine everything and mix well – you should have a pretty soupy consistency at this point.

Set in a middle rack and bake for about 3-4 hours – Check thing and give them a stir after 90 minutes, and every thirty thereafter, checking for fluid balance – if things get too dry, stir in another quarter cup of bean broth.

When everything is bubbling merrily, smells amazing, the beans are tender and the sauce has a nice thick consistency, you’re there.

Serve with whatever you like, but truth be told, you wouldn’t need anything else to be a very happy camper.

P.S. – if any of it survives, it’s flippin’ unbelievable the next day, cold on a bed of crisp lettuce…

Beautiful Barbecue Beans

Wait, more on beans? Yeah, and here’s why. They’re genuinely good for you – They’re a nutrient dense food with antioxidant properties, and eating them regularly can help reduce your risk of a raft of nasty things like cancer, heart troubles, and such – Research it for yourself and see if I’m shooting you straight. 

Better yet, great beans are incredibly tasty and lend themselves to a wide variety of flavors and textures. Last night, when M announced pork ribs for dinner, I whipped up a batch of barbecue beans, (I winged it big time, but they were so dang good I just had to share them here.)

BBQ beans demand a great sauce, and that means made from scratch. The sauce not only provides rich counterpoint to a firm, creamy bean, it also helps make the low and slow cooking process as effective as it is.

First decision is what bean in what form should we use? Dried is my answer, and specifically, Rancho Gordo beans. These are superior beans to dang near anything else you’ve ever tried. If you think you don’t really like beans, try them, and they’ll change your mind – They’re that good. Next question, what variety to use? A lot of folks swear by Great Northern or Navy, and they’re not wrong, but my go to is an RG pinto – These are not the usual nondescript whatever bean most pintos are – These are rich, creamy, firm beans that soak up flavor while maintaining firmness and texture.

You’ll notice a couple other unique ingredients from Rancho Gordo in this recipe. I strongly encourage you to take the plunge and try them, they’re well worth it. They’ll add unique and subtle flavor notes to the finished dish you simply won’t get elsewhere, (but fear not – I’ll offer common subs as well.)

This recipe is scaled for a full pound of beans. While you might not need all that in one sitting, they’ll be fine in the fridge for 3 to 5 days, and if properly packaged, will freeze well for several months, (glass, airtight, minimal air space, will do the deed.) 

I’m calling for a Dutch oven to do the baking in, because a fair amount of y’all have one, (and you don’t, you aughta), but a heavy baking dish will also do fine. If you’re blessed with a clay cooking vessel, then that’s your go to for this dish.

Yes, there’s a lot of stuff in this recipe, but it’s not as complex or time consuming as it might appear, and the rewards are great. While there is always more than one way of building a dish, do try this one as noted. Note that I’m not calling for a pre-cooking soak of the beans – It’s not necessary for a long, low and slow cook like this, and it may well rob them of flavor. You’ll see that I call for salting the water the beans do their initial cooking in – Fact is the ‘never salt beans until they’re done or they’ll be tough,’ mantra is an old wives tale – High quality, fresh beans will come out tasty and tender every time with a little salt in the cooking water.

Granted, this isn’t a super low calorie dish – In fact, with some freshly baked cornbread, a dollop of sour cream and a good IPA, it’s a very hearty meal in and of itself.

Scratch made barbecue beans

Urban’s Barbecue Beans

1 Pound Rancho Gordo Pinto Beans, (and if you’re winging it, good quality Great Northern or Navy beans will do)

2 Cups House Made Chicken Stock, (good store bought will work fine)

8 ounces thick cut Smoked Bacon

1 large yellow Onion, (about a cup and a half or so)

1-2 fresh Chiles, (I like Serrano, but Jalapeños are great too)

1/4 fresh Red Bell Pepper

2 cloves fresh Garlic

1 large fresh Tomato

1 Cup Ketchup

1/2 Cup dark brown Sugar

1/4 Cup Black Strap Molasses

2 Tablespoons Agave Nectar

2 Tablespoons Rancho Gordo stone Ground Chocolate, (other good Mexican disc chocolate is fine)

2 Tablespoons Rancho Gordo Pineapple Vinegar, (Live Cider Vinegar will do as a sub)

2 Tablespoons Yellow Mustard

2 teaspoons fine ground Black Pepper

2 teaspoons ground New Mexican Red Chile powder, (not chili powder, just powdered red chile)

2 teaspoons ground Celery Leaf, (1 teaspoon of seed or celery salt will do fine, if that what you’ve got, for the latter, omit the kosher salt below)

1 teaspoon Hot Sauce, (I prefer Tabasco, but use what you like best)

1 teaspoon fine kosher Salt

Bean Broth

Fresh Water

In a stock pot over high heat, add 6 cups of water, a tablespoon of salt, and whisk to dissolve. Add the beans and adjust water level to maintain at least 2” over the beans, (and more is totally cool).

Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to maintain a brisk simmer for 15 minutes.

cover the stock pot and turn the heat to the lowest setting you’ve got. 

Adjust water level if needed to maintain at least a couple inches above bean level. 

Cover, and leave beans to cook in the barely bubbling bean broth.

Check your beans every 30 minutes for doneness and water level – You want them not done, but very al dente, aka still kinda hard in the middles – and maintain that 2” of water above them. When you’re there, turn off the heat and slide the pot off the burner – This will typically take anywhere from 60 to 90 of cooking time minutes.

Drain the beans, reserving 2 cups of bean broth.

Now it’s time to assemble your mise en place – Use small bowls or dishes for your prepped ingredients.

Cut bacon into roughly 1/2” strips width-wise across each piece.

Peel and fine dice onion. 

Stem chiles (devein if you don’t want full heat), and fine dice.

Stem, trim, and fine dice red pepper.

Smash garlic with the side of a chef knife, peel, end trim, and then mince.

Cut tomato into roughly 1/4” slices, then dice.

You can combine onion, chiles, and red pepper in one bowl. Keep garlic and tomato separate.

Fine grate 2 tablespoons of chocolate.

In a non-reactive mixing bowl, combine ketchup, diced tomatoes, brown sugar, molasses, agave nectar, chocolate, vinegar, mustard, pepper, chile powder, celery leaf, hot sauce, and salt. Whisk to incorporate and set aside to allow flavors to marry.

Preheat oven to 300° F, and place a rack in a middle slot.

In a Dutch oven over medium high heat, add bacon and cook until the lardons are nice and crisp and most of the fat has rendered out. Carefully transfer bacon with a slotted spoon to a plate or bowl covered with clean paper towel – Let as much fat as possible drip back into the Dutch oven as you do so.

Add onion, chiles and red pepper to the Dutch oven and sauté until the onion begins to brown lightly, about 5 minutes. 

Add garlic and sauté until the raw garlic smell dissipates, about 1 minute.

Add chicken stock and deglaze any naughty bits from the bottom of the pan.

Add beans, bacon, and the sauce, and stir to incorporate thoroughly.

Add bean broth and stir until you get a consistency like a stew – Notably wetter than you want the finished beans, with about 1/2” of liquid above bean level.

Let the whole mix reach a simmer, stirring occasionally.

When you’ve got a simmer, cover the Dutch oven and slide that bad boy into the oven, (and don’t forget to turn your burner off.)

After 2 hours, uncover and check moisture level and bean doneness. 

If things get too thick, stir in a little more bean broth.

Total bake will typically take 3 – 4 hours – When beans are done to your liking, pull from the oven and let rest for 15 minutes before digging in.